Diasposter is a WordPress-to-Diaspora crossposting plugin that looks so natural no one knows that you aren’t just posting from D*

I’ve written a new WordPress plugin called Diasposter that has some additional features which go beyond most other WordPress-to-Diaspora crossposting plugins. With Diasposter, you can:

  • choose an aspect to share with,
  • retract (remove) posts from Diaspora when they are deleted from your WordPress blog
  • completely customize or omit the footer of your Diaspora post
  • crosspost custom post types or even write another plugin to programmatically change how Diasposter formats your post.

Diasposter was inspired by the great WP to Diaspora plugin, which I really wanted to make use of but didn’t feel totally comfortable with because of how it stored Diaspora session information in relatively insecure file on the filesystem. In contrast, Diasposter never writes your Diaspora login cookie to disk so your D* access credentials are kept as safe as you make your WordPress database.

You can read about and install Diasposter from the WordPress plugin directory. Please let me know what you think and feel free to provide feedback and/or suggestions on its support forum or the GitHub project tracker.

29 replies on “Diasposter is a WordPress-to-Diaspora crossposting plugin that looks so natural no one knows that you aren’t just posting from D*”

  1. Yeah, it’s basically the same thing as WP to Diaspora but its backend is different, the UI is more streamlined, and I made some different choices about how to present the D* posts. (Note, for instance, there is no `provider_display_name` so Diasposter posts look like regular Web postings). I actually spoke to Augusto about the WP to Diaspora backend before I implemented this new plugin and I mentioned there that I’d be happy to share code or accept or send patches, if it makes sense to do so.

  2. Thanks, both of you. For what it’s worth, this is VERY NEW CODE so please don’t hate me if it falls apart in your setup. I’ve only tested it where I run WordPress and while that’s a fair bit of installs, it doesn’t account for all environments.

    I’ve also just added a few new features like post location (geodata) sharing, so if you’re trying it out and don’t see that feature be sure to grab the latest source from the WordPress plugin’s trunk. View the source here.

  3. Brief update: I implemented service integrations and geolocation sharing in version 0.1.1, which I just released now. This means you can control the auto-tweet or post location information that Diaspora shows in your posts right from WordPress. :)

  4. @Ben, thanks for reporting that, it’s a harmless problem with service integration that I jist added (the ability to control whether D* broadcasts your post to twitter/facebook/tumblr/facebook, etc). I’ll roll a fix for that warning into the next version. :)

  5. the ability to control whether D* broadcasts your post to twitter/facebook/tumblr/facebook, etc

    Curious – are you doing this as a single toggle or one for each service? I’m asking because I had planned on doing this with the WP to Redmatrix poster, but the list of services we can post to is kind of long and somewhat open-ended. We would really have to query the hub and see which ones are installed (and) enabled.

  6. That’s exactly what I’m doing: querying the Diaspora* pod, seeing which ones are enabled, then caching the response in the WordPress database until the next fetch (which currently just uses a polling timer triggered by whatever next action needs this information, so as to avoid the need for manual "refresh" buttons a user has to push and so on).

    Honestly it’s kind of a hack since Diaspora has no formal API to speak of, but it does work, so shrug*.

  7. Also, for those still keeping track of this discussion, I just added Featured Image crossposting support, which means your WordPress post thumbnails now get uploaded directly to Diaspora* as images in your post. :)

    Let me know how this doesn’t work for you, or if you want more/different features, since it’s all brand spanking new and so on. :)

  8. Thanks, Mike. I’m working my way up to understanding #RedMatrix and even parts of Diaspora*, honestly, so partly this plugin is just a way to give myself a tool to more comfortably fit with my personal publishing workflow (all based on WordPress) while also learning about how D* behaves from a Web development perspective. No API means I do manual scraping but that is certainly one way to learn. :)

  9. Another brief update: I got comment sync’ing to work. This means comments on your cross-posted WordPress entries that were made on Diaspora now get pulled back to your WordPress post as native comments, there. Update to version 0.1.4 to get the new feature, then activate it from the plugin’s "Sync options" settings.

  10. Have you met the Internet?

    Have you heard about Aaron Schwarz?

    Reproducing a fragment of someone’s comment is called "fair use" (or "fair dealing", so smth else, depending on the country), and thus [probably] not a copyright violation. Reproducing the same comment, together with many others, without the authors’ consent (or even against their will) in a systematical/automated manner might not count as "fair use", and thus might be illegal. The users of WP+Diaspora, especially those who write a lot and get commented a lot, are exposed to the risk of [unknowingly] breaking the law by using your plugin. Correct me if I am wrong.

    I’m not defending the copyright legislation. I am pointing out a potential risk for the users of your plugin. The rest is up to you.

    Thank you.

  11. @Vitalie Ciubotaru:

    LOL!

    Reproducing the same comment, together with many others, without the authors’ consent (or even against their will) in a systematical/automated manner might not count as "fair use", and thus might be illegal.

    You wrote this comment on a federated social network and you do not see the irony. I am incredibly amused. :) Good joke, man.

  12. It’s actually a very touchy legal issue. There are still folks (mostly American) who sue for copyright infringement if you republish their content somewhere; and without manually pulling in comments and commenting on *them* it isn’t fair use – the only possible defense. It makes one no less guilty of infringement, it’s merely a possible defense that might hold up in court. I was hit with this personally about 6 years ago and had to hire lawyers to make the problem go away and also ended up shutting down a feed reader service that I wrote to come to an acceptable conclusion for both parties. It was quite expensive and frivolous.

    Basically any author owns their original expression and can control the manifestations of that expression.  Whether you agree with this or not is irrelevant – it’s coded into law so deeply that it can’t be extricated.

    I don’t believe the courts have yet been presented a case where somebody provided a defense based on a public "message" which was being "delivered" to the public.

    Also, at least in the US, the DMCA absolves responsibility of the service provider  and places the blame squarely on the member who caused the offending violation. So you may be OK, but folks who use the plugin might be at risk.  It’s a real messy mess. To qualify for DMCA protection you must have a way to respond to take-down notices and this procedure is spelled out in detail in the DMCA.

    I’m not telling you what to do and I’m sympathetic. I’m just letting you know that Vitalie has a point and it can’t really be dismissed with ridicule. Those of us creating/providing communications services are sometimes left in a real quandary what to do. Incidentally the redmatrix wordpress connector does exactly the same thing – so I’m very interested in figuring a way around any possible legal quagmires. As soon as you get lawyers involved everything gets screwed up quickly. Some earlier attempts at trying to solve this have put CC licenses on the entire network, but never resolved the question of what happens with federated communications onto another network with an incompatible or non-existent license.  

  13. Another brief update: version 0.1.6 of Diasposter now supports native "photoset" posts. Use the "Image" or "Gallery" post format in your WordPress post, insert any number of images in the post, and Diasposter will upload your WP images directly to the Diasposter post, giving your Diaspora* post the "gallery" feel, with image thumbnails as you’d expect. Enjoy!

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