BYOC: Your Blog, Your Way

For bloggers who really want to own their own content, Bring Your Own Content (BYOC) is a free toolkit for creating and managing content on one or more free web hosting providers simultaneously using a single, familiar dashboard. https://github.com/meitar/byoc/#readme You might have read about BYOC on LifeHacker some time ago. This is the first reproducible […]

HowTo: Make an archival copy of every page, image, video, and audio file on an entire website using wget

I recently announced that my blog archives will no longer be publicly available for long: Let me repeat that: while I am still “on Tumblr” and so on for now, my archives will not remain available for very long. If you find something of mine useful, you will need to make a copy of it […]

Unlike Twitter itself, Predator Alert Tool for Twitter is a private-by-default, public-by-effort application.

I’m still hacking away on Predator Alert Tool for Twitter, but I’ve just finished putting some final wax and polish on the user interface for warnlist privacy options. What’s really exciting about this is that, unlike Twitter itself, in Predator Alert Tool for Twitter, “private” actually means what it says on the tin. When you […]

“Bring Your Own Content” Web publishing virtual appliance posted to LifeHacker

Thanks to Alan Henry, who signal-boosted my “Bring Your Own Content” Web publishing virtual appliance project on LifeHacker: We’ve discussed some of the best blogging platforms and web hosts, but if you want to really control your data, why not roll your own server at home, and then use it as a dashboard to manage […]

Political think tank migrates off Tumblr to WordPress using Tumblr Crosspostr

[T]hanks to the fabulous Tumblr Crosspostr plugin developed by Meitar Moscovitz, we’re still publishing In Brief to Tumblr, so as not to leave any of our Tumblr followers behind! In Brief on Tumblr is now basically just a mirror that will automatically update whenever we publish a new item with WordPress. This migration was in […]

Bring Your Own Content: Virtual Self-Hosting Web Publishing

Dear LifeHacker readers, you may be under the impression this tool is designed for hosting your own content, rather than providing a way to easily piggyback on the robust Web hosting services provided for free from outlets such as Tumblr.com and WordPress.com. Please read this clarifying comment for a more appropriate contextualization about the intended […]